Tag Archives: Restoration and Reconstruction

Whether Shrink-wrapping


Shrink-wrapping is a process by which a thin film is stretched taut over an object. The closer the film to the object, the tighter the two conform. The term applies the same way when it comes to paleontological reconstruction of … Continue reading

Posted in Art, Biological Comparison, Biology, Paleobiology, Paleontology, Reconstruction | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Muscles and Style


Look at the surface of an animal, you will see what the animal looks like. Look beneath the surface, you will see why it looks that way. I’ve done a few musculature studies of fossil animals over the years, and … Continue reading

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What To Do With Crests – Updated


Yesterday — on April 1st, which is about as warning bells as they come — I uploaded a post with a host of new art. This post is as much an admission that that post, somewhat subtly, is a joke. … Continue reading

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What To Do With Crests


Over the course of looking at the new specimen of Edmontosaurus (Bell et al., 2014) sporting an odd accretion, I had an epiphany: The “cock’s comb” was, in fact, merely a segment of the neck, falsely and purposely isolated by … Continue reading

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The Emaciated Tyrannosaur – a Reply to Ford, 1997


Posted in Biological Comparison, Biology, Paleobiology, Paleontology, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , | 28 Comments

Long-Awaited Responses, and Orpheus


In a little while, you dear reader will see what this is a part of. If you know what these are, then you’ll know what they have in common and thus why they’re being shown. But the answer isn’t tricky: … Continue reading

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Something About Overbites


Some animals have overbites. it’s fairly common enough that animals (and humans) are born where the upper and lower dentition do not precisely match. Sometimes this alignment can be severe and affects diet. Other times, it is hardly noticeable. But … Continue reading

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